Year in Review

APRIL

We commenced a national campaign to change the way support is provided to people living with multiple and complex needs. Our Simple Change for Troubled Lives manifesto, supported by extensive research, called for five simple changes: it was sent to every MP in the country and contributed to parliamentary debate.

Andrew Redfern Launches the Simple Change campaign with staff and service users.

MAY

We launched our new Clean Slate service, which aims to cut re-offending rates by tackling offenders’ alcohol and drug dependencies. The service, funded by the Nottingham Crime and Drugs Partnership, operates in Nottingham.

JUNE

Our successful street outreach service in Lincolnshire and Rutland ended after three years of life-changing interventions across all parts of the county. Our team developed the first professional response to rough sleeping in these areas, working with more than 1,200 people during that time. The service has been taken on by another provider and is operated in the same way.

JULY

We launched On Track, a new accommodation service in Lincolnshire, made up of quick access / emergency accommodation and move-on accommodation. The service can accommodate 159 people each night across Lincoln, Boston, South Holland and North Kesteven.

AUGUST

We launched a new supported accommodation service for homeless young people between the ages of 16 and 21. Transitions incorporates some existing Framework services for young people and provides staffed and move-on accommodation. It now operates in the Mansfield, Ashfield, Broxtowe, Gedling and Rushcliffe areas of Nottinghamshire.

SEPTEMBER

We formally launched our Nature in Mind service, a Big Lottery funded eco-therapy project in Nottingham. The service helps hundreds of vulnerable and excluded people to improve their mental health by providing supported access to nature-based and craft-related activities.

Staff and clients at our Nature in Mind allotment

OCTOBER

Staff and clients of our SAFE service, which helps homeless young people in Derbyshire, staged a 24-hour awareness raising sofa push event in Chesterfield. The sofa, which

drew attention to sofa surfing, was pushed by volunteers, including staff from Chesterfield FC and the Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner.

SAFE service users and staff pose ahead of their 24hr sofa push with th Derbyshire Police and Crime Commissioner

NOVEMBER

More than 250 people took part in the annual Big Sleep Out event in Nottingham, raising more than £30,000 to support people sleeping rough. The event was again sponsored by Nottingham Building Society.

DECEMBER

We held a national conference on the subject of multiple needs – combinations of homelessness, substance abuse, mental ill-health and repeat offending. The event attracted an audience of more than 200 to Nottingham’s Albert Hall.

Framework s Impact Briefing took place at the Albert Hall  Nottingham

JANUARY

We began delivery of a new service to support adults living with severe learning disabilities and acquired brain injuries. The Brighter Futures service supports people across the districts and boroughs of Nottinghamshire.

FEBRUARY

We announced the closure of The Music Exchange – a pioneering record shop and our first social enterprise. The award-winning shop, in Stoney Street, Nottingham, gave hundreds of volunteers – often from vulnerable backgrounds – the chance to experience work and develop their skills. Despite its popularity, its losses could no longer be sustained.

MARCH

We closed our specialist homelessness prevention services in the districts and boroughs of Nottinghamshire. These services, which had helped tens of thousands of people over a period of thirteen years, were funded by Nottinghamshire County Council.